Author Archives: Julian

Landfill, Liquefaction, and Loma Prieta

Say what you will about San Francisco’s Marina District. It has its fans and its detractors, and plenty of stereotypes to go around no matter which side your opinion falls on. But today, the anniversary of the M6.9 1989 Loma … Continue reading

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Complex Fault Geometry Is Delicious

There’s a lot of frustration and restarting and re-coding and waiting inherent in numerical modeling. Once everything works, running the models needed to answer a given question is just a matter of processing time, but up until that time when … Continue reading

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The Airliner Chronicles: ONT to PDX

Today, I flew on Alaska Airlines from ONT to PDX. I had a window seat on the right side of the plane. If you are geologically inclined, or a fan of natural landmarks of California and Oregon, you will want … Continue reading

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2012 Seismological Society of America Meeting

I really truly always mean to liveblog the conferences that I go to. Each time, I tell myself that I’m going to be on top of it, and that I’ll sum up the thoughts of the rampant livetweeting into a … Continue reading

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Bulletins from the City that Was

Recently, I came across a link to the California Digital Newspaper Collection, which includes scans and full texts of many newspapers from around the state, dating from the 1840s into the present. It’s a fantastic resource, and yet somehow one … Continue reading

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Accretionary Wedge #42: Natural History Museum Floor

I am grateful that the topic of this month’s Accretionary Wedge was expanded from just countertops to include any sort of decorative rock, because I grew up in a sadly formica- and linoleum-laden household. Sure, there were nice hardwood floors … Continue reading

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Accretionary Wedge #41: El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake

The El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake was a M7.2 centered in Baja California, Mexico, that occurred on 4 April 2010. It was the largest earthquake in Baja California since 1892, and the largest to shake southern California since the M7.3 1992 Landers … Continue reading

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Conference Poster Comedy of Errors

There is a poster that displays the results of my latest models, all happily rolled up in its poster tube, sitting in the back seat of my car and waiting to be driven to San Francisco in the morning. Getting … Continue reading

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The Perils of Fault Meshing

Anyone who follows me on Twitter has surely seen me kvetching a whole lot about fault meshing lately. I figure, given my whines and curses, that I owe you all an explanation of what exactly it is that I’ve been … Continue reading

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Let’s try this again, shall we?

I know I’ve let my blogging habits slip quite badly. I used to write a lot of things in a lot of places around the internet, and I slowly fell out of the habit of writing in any of them. … Continue reading

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